CITY OF LAREDO UTILITIES

P. O.  BOX 2950

LAREDO, TEXAS 78044

 

 WATER QUALITY REPORTS FOR 1999

 

COLOMBIA BRIDGE                                            SANTA ISABEL


 

CITY OF LAREDO

1999

WATER QUALITY

REPORT

 

En Español:  Este reporte le informa que el Departamento de Agua de la Ciudad de Laredo, Texas le proveé agua que cumple con todas las normas gubernamentales.  Para solicitar  este folleto en español, por favor llame al (956)795-2600.

 

 

The Water Quality of the City of Laredo is Ranked “Superior” by the Texas

Natural Resource

Conservation Commission

Our mission is to deliver “SUPERIOR” quality water that exceeds State and Federal requirements.  We want you, the consumer, to be aware of what is in your drinking water.  The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996 require public water systems to report to their customers every year what is in their water and how much (much like a report card).  The City of Laredo tests for more constituents than are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  We are happy to report that Laredo’s water meets all standards of the SDWA.  Please take a few minutes to review our report card.

 

Water  Source

The source of Laredo’s water is surface water from the Rio Grande River.  The Rio Grande which runs between the United States and Mexico is our only source of water.  Environmental concerns regarding its cleanliness is the first thing consumers think of when they realize this, but rest assured that thanks to our excellent treatment plants we convert this water into potable water that meets and exceeds all quality requirements.

 

TEXAS

 

LAREDO

 

MEXICO

 

 

 

Special Information for People with

Weakened Immune Systems

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  Environmental Protection Agency/Center for Disease Control  guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

 

Understanding the Charts

 

The information contained in this report is based on official data compiled by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in 1999.

 

Definitions:

(1) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

(2) Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk.  MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety.

(3) Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

(4) Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) - The unit used to measure water turbidity.

(5) Turbidity - A measurement of the cloudiness of water.

(6) Treatment Technique - A required process, i.e. filtration, intended to reduce the level of a contaminant (such as turbidity) in drinking water.

(7) ppm - Parts per million.

(8) ppb - Parts per billion.

(9) pCi/l -  Picocuries per liter ( a measure of radioactivity).

 

Regulations Applicable at the Treatment Plant

 

Constituent

Range of Detected Levels

Highest Level Detected

MCL (1)

MCLG (2)

Possible Source of Contamination

Barium

0.01-0.075

0.075 ppm (7)

2 ppm

2 ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries.

Fluoride

0.3-0.4

0.4 ppm

4 ppm

4 ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate

0.01-0.46

0.46 ppm

10 ppm

10 ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage.

Nitrite

0.01

0.01 ppm

1 ppm

1ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage.

Selenium

2.1

2.1 ppb (8)

50 ppb

50 ppb

Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Discharge from mines.

 

Turbidity (5) (6)

The regulations require that 95% of all water samples be below 0.5 NTU (4).  In 1999 Laredo tap water turbidity ranged from 0.1 to 1.4 NTU.  Only 8 samples out of 3,577 were above the permitted limit.  That means Laredo water met the MCL 99.8% of the time.  In August 1999 the MCL was met 97.6% of the time.  Turbidity finds its way to the river water from soil runoff.

 

Regulations Applicable in the Distribution System

 

Constituent

Range of Detected Levels

Laredo Water

MCL

MCLG

Possible Source of Contamination

Gross Alpha Adjusted

1.6

1.6 pCi/l (9)

15 pCi/l

0 pCi/l

Erosion of natural deposits.

Total Trihalomethanes

39-102

Average of All Sampling Points =69 ppb

100 ppb

0 ppb

By-product of drinking water

chlorination.

 

Total Coliform Bacteria

The regulations require that 95% of samples be free of Coliform Bacteria.  In 1999 Laredo tap water samples were 99.9% free of this bacteria.  In January and April 1999, 99.2% of the samples were free of bacteria.  This means that only 2 out of 1446 samples showed the presence of bacteria.  Coliform Bacteria is naturally present in the environment.

 

Regulations Applicable at the Customer’s Tap

 

Constituent

The 90th Percentile

Number of Sites Exceeding Action Level

Action Level (3)

Possible Source of Contamination

Lead

2.8 ppb

0

15 ppb

Erosion of natural deposits; Corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Copper

0.060 ppm

0

1.3 ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Leaching from wood preservatives.

 

Your Drinking Water is Safe

 

ALL drinking water may contain contaminants.

When drinking water meets federal standards there may not be any health based benefits to purchasing bottled water or point of use devices. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

We Welcome Your Comments

For questions or concerns about water quality, to request a speaker for your group, or for inquiries about public participation and policy decisions, call 795-2600.

 

The Utilities Department is part of the city government.  The City Council meets on the first, third, and fourth Monday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at City Council chambers on 1110 Houston Street.

 

 

 

CITY OF LAREDO

COLOMBIA BRIDGE

WATER PLANT

1999

WATER QUALITY

REPORT

 

SANTA ISABEL                                                                                 CITY OF LAREDO

En Español:  Este reporte le informa que el Departamento de Agua de la Ciudad de Laredo, Texas le proveé agua que cumple con todas las normas gubernamentales.  Para solicitar  este folleto en español, por favor llame al (956)795-2600.

 

 

The Water Quality of the City of Laredo is Ranked “Superior” by the Texas

Natural Resource

Conservation Commission

Our mission is to deliver “SUPERIOR” quality water that exceeds State and Federal requirements.  We want you, the consumer, to be aware of what is in your drinking water.  The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996 require public water systems to report to their customers every year what is in their water and how much (much like a report card).  The City of Laredo tests for more constituents than are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  We are happy to report that Laredo’s water meets all standards of the SDWA.  Please take a few minutes to review our report card.

 

Water  Source

The source of Laredo’s water is surface water from the Rio Grande River.  The Rio Grande which runs between the United States and Mexico is our only source of water.  Environmental concerns regarding its cleanliness is the first thing consumers think of when they realize this, but rest assured that thanks to our excellent treatment plants we convert this water into potable water that meets and exceeds all quality requirements.

 

LAREDO

 

MEXICO

 

TEXAS

 

 

 

Special Information for People with

Weakened Immune Systems

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  Environmental Protection Agency/Center for Disease Control  guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

Understanding the Charts

 

The information contained in this report is based on official data compiled by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in 1999.

 

Definitions:

(1) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

(2) Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) - The unit used to measure water turbidity.

(3) Turbidity - A measurement of the cloudiness of water.

(4) Treatment Technique - A required process, i.e. filtration, intended to reduce the level of a contaminant (such as turbidity) in drinking water.

 

 

Regulations Applicable at the Treatment Plant

 

 

Turbidity (3) (4)

The regulations require that 95% of all water samples be below 0.5 NTU (2).  In 1999 Laredo tap water turbidity ranged from 0.03 to 0.2 NTU.  Zero samples out of 364 were above the permitted limit.  That means Laredo water met the MCL (1) 100% of the time.  Turbidity finds its way to the river water from soil runoff.

 

Regulations Applicable in the Distribution System

 

Total Coliform Bacteria

The regulations require that 95% of samples be free of Coliform Bacteria.  In 1999 Laredo tap water samples were 100% free of this bacteria.  Coliform Bacteria is naturally present in the environment.

 

Your Drinking Water Is Safe

 

ALL drinking water may contain contaminants.

When drinking water meets federal standards there may not be any health based benefits to purchasing bottled water or point of use devices.  Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

 

We Welcome Your Comments

For questions or concerns about water quality, to request a speaker for your group, or for inquiries about public participation and policy decisions, call 795-2600.

 

The Utilities Department is part of the city government.  The City Council meets on the first, third, and fourth Monday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at City Council chambers on 1110 Houston Street.

 

 

 

 

 

CITY OF LAREDO

SANTA ISABEL

WATER WELL

1999

WATER QUALITY

REPORT

COLOMBIA BRIDGE                                                                          CITY OF LAREDO

En Español:  Este reporte le informa que el Departamento de Agua de la Ciudad de Laredo, Texas le proveé agua que cumple con todas las normas gubernamentales.  Para solicitar  este folleto en español, por favor llame al (956)795-2600.

 

 

The Water Quality of the City of Laredo is Ranked “Superior” by the Texas

Natural Resource

Conservation Commission

Our mission is to deliver “SUPERIOR” quality water that exceeds State and Federal requirements.  We want you, the consumer, to be aware of what is in your drinking water.  The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996 require public water systems to report to their customers every year what is in their water and how much (much like a report card).  The City of Laredo tests for more constituents than are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  We are happy to report that Laredo’s water meets all standards of the SDWA.  Please take a few minutes to review our report card.

 

Water  Source

The source of Santa Isabel’s water is ground water from the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer.  The water in this aquifer is very saline, but rest assured that thanks to our excellent treatment plant we convert this water into potable water that meets and exceeds all quality requirements.

 

MEXICO

 

TEXAS

 

LAREDO

 

 

Special Information for People with

Weakened Immune Systems

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  Environmental Protection Agency/Center for Disease Control  guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

Understanding the Charts

 

The information contained in this report is based on official data compiled by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in 1999.

 

Definitions:

(1) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

(2) Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) - The unit used to measure water turbidity.

(3) Turbidity - A measurement of the cloudiness of water.

(4) Treatment Technique - A required process, i.e. filtration, intended to reduce the level of a contaminant (such as turbidity) in drinking water.

 

Regulations Applicable at the Treatment Plant

 

 

Turbidity (3) (4)

The regulations require that 95% of all water samples be below 0.5 NTU (2).  In 1999 Santa Isabel water turbidity ranged from 0 to 0.43 NTU.  Zero samples out of 364 were above the permitted limit.  That means Santa Isabel water met the MCL (1) 100% of the time.  Turbidity finds its way to the water from soil runoff.

 

Regulations Applicable in the Distribution System

 

Total Coliform Bacteria

The regulations require that 95% of samples be free of Coliform Bacteria.  In 1999 Santa Isabel  water samples were 100% free of this bacteria.  Coliform Bacteria is naturally present in the environment.

 

Your Drinking Water is Safe

 

ALL drinking water may contain contaminants.

When drinking water meets federal standards there may not be any health based benefits to purchasing bottled water or point of use devices.  Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

We Welcome Your Comments

For questions or concerns about water quality, to request a speaker for your group, or for inquiries about public participation and policy decisions, call 795-2600.

 

The Utilities Department is part of the city government.  The City Council meets on the first, third, and fourth Monday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at City Council chambers on 1110 Houston Street.